Speeches

Saturday, July 7, 2012 (All day)

Ten years ago, I took part in the first Tokyo conference on Afghanistan on behalf of the United States Government. In many ways, I have a strong sense of deja vu. In January 2002, in the wake of the fall of the Taliban, the world came together to pledge our mutual commitment to support the stability and reconstruction of a fragile and devastated Afghanistan. Working together as a community in support of the Afghan people and government, we have kept faith over the past decade. This fact is reflected in a 15 year increase in life expectancy for the Afghan people; the presence of some seven million students – of which nearly 40 percent are girls -- in schools; a huge decline in infant and maternal mortality; and a three-fold increase in per capita income.

Tuesday, July 3, 2012 (All day)

In Tokyo, the international community and the Afghans will come together to discuss the best way to solidify the progress we've made in the past decade.  The timing of this conference is significant because it some so quickly on the heels of the G8 in Chicago that focused on the 2014 transition. As we all know, there are really two transitions in 2014 - the transfer of security operations to the Afghans, and also the first democratic transfer of power in the history of Afghanistan.

Thursday, June 21, 2012 (All day)

Dignity and freedom were the banners of the peaceful revolutionaries. They came carrying dignity, and another banner as well, their humanity. They were searching for the humanity inside them; they lost their humanity because of oppression, corruption and injustice. They came sacrificing their lives, their money, their property, and their children – carrying dignity and humanity. The dignity they were asking for was not in vain. This is something God has granted them.

All religions in the world talk about the dignity of the human being. Islam talks about dignity for humans; this is a part of the Quran. Also, the same thing is in the Holy Bible. This dignity comes from humans as a means for rights. This dignity is a regional value that is carried by all human beings, despite their backgrounds or their beliefs.  The youths of the Arab Spring and the women raise a banner of dignity, freedom and justice. Free people of the world – let us work for the dignity of all people.

And in the forefront of the Arab Spring, let us support dignity there; let us support dignity in your own countries. You may be surprised why I say your country instead of our country – because i always believed that humanity, that all of the people of the world are one nation. All of humanity is one nation, and all of the people are brothers.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012 - 11:00am

I am very pleased to witness the signing of the Development Objective Agreements between the United States Agency for International Development and the Government of Ethiopia. These agreements cover the first year of the new five-year USAID Country Development Strategy and reflect the close consultation and cooperation of our two governments in all areas of social and economic development and in all regions of Ethiopia.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012 - 10:00am

Every year, we come to the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development to sign bi-lateral assistance agreement that describe the mutually agreed upon plans for development cooperation between the U.S. Government, through USAID, and the Government of Ethiopia, through the Ministry, working on various sectors of social and economic development.

Friday, June 15, 2012 (All day)

 

JACK LESLIE:  Well, good morning, everyone, and welcome to the Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid.  I’m Jack Leslie.  I am delighted to serve as chair for our proceedings today.  I’ll try to keep things on track.  I wanted to start by thanking Georgetown University.  They’ve been very nice to provide their facilities all week long for so many activities, and this big tent, which I guess gives new meaning to the word open meeting.  We certainly have an open meeting.  We’re glad too, that all of you came to join us this morning. 

Thursday, June 14, 2012 (All day)

Good morning.  I want to thank Dean Lancaster for opening up Georgetown for partnership and hosting this important session today.  I want to thank Minister Tedros and Mr. Azad from Ethiopia and India, respectively, for co-convening this effort and the executive director of UNICEF, Tony Lake, for your leadership in making all of this possible.
I know we’re all also quite excited to hear from both Secretary Clinton and Ben Affleck this morning.  And so we’re eager to see them and I thank so many honored guests and excellencies who have come from around the world to be with us.  Welcome to Washington.  

Thursday, May 31, 2012 (All day)

Thinking back to the lesson of the Central African Republic, our strategies must involve them as planners, implementers and beneficiaries of all our programs.  We have an expression at AID:  “Nothing about them without them.”   Let that admonition guide our work over the next two days.  I wish you a productive two days, and I look forward to the outcome of your deliberations and follow up actions.  

Saturday, May 12, 2012 (All day)

As you’ve probably had to explain to your grandparents, I’m Raj Shah, Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development. Hopefully that explanation was easier than usual, because unlike many audiences I’m asked to speak to, most of you have actually heard of USAID.

How do I know?

Last week, I sent an e-mail to our Agency’s staff, telling them that I’d be at SIS and asking alumni to share their experiences. I assumed I’d get a handful of replies, with alumni telling me about their favorite classes or the name of a popular hangout that I could mention for an easy applause line. But then e-mails started flooding in. From Angola and the Philippines and Lesotho and Bolivia. From a gender advisor working to ensure pregnant mothers have access to HIV medication so their children are born AIDS-free. And from a member of our cutting-edge mobile partnerships team, who’s helping transform Haiti into one of the world’s first mobile banking economies.

Friday, May 11, 2012 (All day)

 

[As prepared for delivery]

I consider it a true privilege to visit this university. Generations of leaders and scholars from this university overcame towering obstacles and deep injustices to shape a better future, and it’s truly humbling to address students who uphold that tradition.

But I also consider it a privilege to speak before your class in particular, the Tuskegee class of 2012.

Pages

Last updated: October 22, 2014

Subscribe to Speeches