Speeches

Wednesday, September 26, 2012 (All day)

This is an exciting and important time for development. We’re beginning to see incredible results taking shape—results that aren’t just impacting individuals or communities, but entire nations. El Salvador has achieved 96 percent primary school completion rates for boys and girls—up from 81 percent 10 years ago. In Ethiopia, in the last six years, under-5 mortality has fallen by almost 30 percent—thanks, in part, to efforts to empower 30,000 community health workers with live-saving tools.

And in Afghanistan—probably one of the hardest places on earth to see clear development results—we’ve helped reduce maternal mortality to one-fifth of what it was a decade ago and expand basic services from only 6 percent of the country to 64 percent. Some of these results have brought us above and beyond our MDG targets, as we’ve seen this past year, when the world met the goals of reducing poverty by 50 percent and halving the proportion of people without access to clean drinking water.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 (All day)

Remarks as Prepared

It is a pleasure to join you today, because I believe we have a real opportunity at this moment in development. For decades, our community has talked about the importance of building community resilience to perennial disasters, like droughts and floods.

But every year, as many as half of our emergency workforce mobilizes to East Africa. And every year, communities from the Horn of Africa to the Sahel brace for a possible season of lost livelihoods—a season of starvation.

Monday, September 24, 2012 (All day)

We know that more than 90 percent of the adult population in the developing world is unbanked. And more than 2 billion of these unbanked individuals are already using mobile phones in deeply innovative ways. In fact, I’ve seen the real potential for this work myself not far outside of Nairobi, where I met a dairy farmer named Gitau who didn’t have access to the electric grid or running water. But by using a mobile phone app called iCOW, he could invest in his business, vaccinate his animals, improve their feedstock, and track milk output and local prices. “Information is power,” he told me.

There’s an exciting opportunity here for those of us working in this field. An opportunity to usher in a new era of development by forming public-private partnerships that change the way we do business—while expanding opportunity to millions. That’s why we came together to build a network called the Better Than Cash Alliance—to accelerate the adoption of electronic payments around the world and to bring electronic payments and mobile money into our USAID programming with an eye towards greater gender equality and financial inclusion.

Friday, September 21, 2012 (All day)

Time and again, the U.S. Agency for International Development has turned to the researchers, professors, and students here at FIU to help us tackle some of the greatest challenges of our time: from minimizing the risk of disasters in El Salvador to ensuring the sustainability of some of our most precious natural resources, like the Mara River in Tanzania. It’s a partnership that has not only grown over time, but has delivered some extraordinary results for people around the world.

In the late 1980s, FIU and USAID partnered on the Agency’s first major media initiative, which focused on training journalists across Latin America in investigative journalism and election coverage. Within a few years, it brought media owners and journalists together to produce the first journalist ethics code for Central America. This effort built on a long-standing partnership—dating back to 1984—to strengthen the capacity of justice systems in Latin American countries. 

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 2:30am

Hôm nay tôi vinh dự được tham gia khai mạc cuộc họp thường niên lần thứ bảy của Uỷ Ban Tư vấn Hỗn hợp (JAC) về Chất Da cam. Tôi xin cảm ơn Thứ trưởng Tuyến đã chủ trì cuộc họp trong trụ sở mới này. Tôi cũng xin cảm ơn các đối tác quốc tế đã tham dự cùng chúng tôi trong buổi họp sáng nay, bao gồm các đại diện của Liên hợp quốc, Cộng hoà Séc và New Zealand. Sự có mặt của các quí vị ở đây đã cho thấy mối quan hệ cộng tác mang tính đa phương đang giúp Việt Nam xử lý những thách thức về môi trường và y tế liên quan tới chất da cam.

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 2:30am

HANOI -- Good morning. It is my great pleasure to help open the seventh annual meeting of the Joint Advisory Committee. I would like to thank Deputy Minister Tuyen for hosting this meeting in your new headquarters building. I would also like to recognize the international partners who have joined us this morning, including representatives from the United Nations, the Czech Republic, and New Zealand.

Your presence here exemplifies the multilateral partnership that is helping Vietnam respond to environmental and health challenges related to Agent Orange.

Friday, September 14, 2012 - 10:30am

USAID has been very happy to partner with the American Bar Association and the Addis Ababa University Law School in the development and publication of five legal textbooks authored by Ethiopian legal experts. I am especially proud of this collaboration since this is the first set of textbooks to be revised in 40 years. This is a remarkable and commendable achievement. I congratulate the authors who are faculty at Addis Ababa University and St. Mary's College--Ato Getachew Assefa, Ato Muradu Abdo, Ato Elias Stebek, Ato Wondwossen Demissie and Ato Fikremarian Merso.

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 - 9:45am

Thank you to the Government of Ethiopia, particularly to the Ministry of Agriculture for hosting this workshop along with the Agricultural Transformation Agency and the Joint Sector Working Group for Rural Economic Development and Food Security which is co-chaired by the Ministry, the World Bank, and USAID. Welcome to all participants, particularly my fellow G-8 colleagues, private sector partners, and other new and potential partners in this grand New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in Ethiopia.

Monday, September 10, 2012 (All day)

At USAID, we believe we have the opportunity today build a new, more open model for development that builds on our strong legacy of university engagement to solve some of the greatest development challenges of our time. In food security, that challenge is more pressing than ever. By 2050, the world will need to double agricultural production in order to feed a world of 9 billion people. At the same time, a changing climate will lead to warmer temperatures, more erratic rains, and longer more severe droughts.

Here in Mississippi, you know this better than anyone. The Mississippi river has fallen to near record lows—and a stretch of the mighty river near Greenville has had to close briefly.  And rural communities across the country continue to feel pressure from a parched land. But the truth is that our nation has some remarkable systems in place to support farmers and ranchers in a time of significant drought. They can buy insurance products, access our government’s real-time data monitoring, and count on the USDA and universities like MSU to study the problem and foster new solutions.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 (All day)

The United States, President Obama and Secretary Clinton, have been very clear that we are calling on the Assad regime to end its brutal treatment and attacks on its own people.  And President Obama has also asked us, the United States, to do everything we can to support the critical humanitarian needs that are in this region.

That's why we've already provided more than $82 million of support for humanitarian priorities, reaching more than 700,000 Syrians with food, water and medical support.  And that's why, today, I'm quite pleased to announce an additional $21 million commitment.  In this case to our colleagues at the World Food Programme, who are taking responsibility for providing effective food access to people who are in dire need, here in this camp, throughout parts of Syria and in other parts of the region. 

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Last updated: October 24, 2014

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