Fact Sheets

The program seeks to strengthen Pakistan's power generation and transmission systems and promote relevant policy reform. The project provides advice and technologies, as well as oversees USAID­funded construction and repairs of thermal power plants and dams. Through these and other efforts, the project is helping the Government of Pakistan to put more power on the national grid, decrease losses in revenues, and increase cost recovery by the power generation institutions.

This project funded the repair and rehabilitation of the Muzaffargarh Thermal Power Plant located 45 kilometers southwest of Multan City in southern Punjab. The power station has a 1,350 megawatts (MW) installed capacity, but before the USAID­ funded repairs, the plant was only producing 835 MW due to the aging equipment, deferred maintenance, and lack of proper fuel.

This project helped modernize three (out of the total of 14) generators at the Tarbela hydroelectric power station in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa near the border with Afghanistan. 

Through this project, USAID funds the repairs and maintenance work at the Guddu Power Station in northern Sindh. Upon completion, the project will increase the station's generation capacity by at least 75 megawatts­­ enough power to supply electricity to about 100,000 households.

This project performs a comprehensive assessment of environmental and social impact of the proposed multi­purpose Kuram Tangi dam and irrigation system. 

The program works to increase the amount of power that is available to consumers by helping various entities in the power distribution chain to improve their performance.

Through this project, USAID funds the construction of the Satpara Dam, a multipurpose water and power facility at the edge of the Skardu City in Gilgit­Baltistan near the border with China and India.

The Demographic Health Survey Project supports the implementation of the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) 2012­13. This survey provides high­quality data and analysis to support evidence­based health policymaking and programming in Pakistan. The survey is similar to ones funded by the U.S. Government in 85 countries over the last 27 years. A previous Pakistan DHS supported by USAID was released in 2006­2007, and it focused on providing data about the status of key maternal and child health and family planning indicators in the country.

In order to complement investments in building management and technical capacity to deliver quality health services, USAID also supports targeted infrastructure improvement. USAID's support includes minor renovations, facility expansions, and new construction designed to be very energy efficient and to incorporate green-building technology. The Jacobabad Institute of Medical Sciences (JIMS) Project supports the construction of a new 150 bed hospital in Jacobabad, a city in one of the poorest areas of Pakistan in northern Sindh province.

USAID's new Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Program comprises of five major components, which work through a public-private partnership mix, including the Government of Pakistan (GOP), the private sector, the philanthropic sector, non-governmental organizations, local civil society, and community organizations. These components are: 1) family planning and reproductive health services, 2) maternal, newborn, and child health services; 3) health communications; 4) health commodities and supplies; and 5) health systems strengthening.

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Last updated: March 31, 2015