Fact Sheets

Through its four-year New Opportunities for Agriculture (NOA) Program, USAID is focused on implementing the recommendations proposed in Kosovo’s 2010 Agriculture Strategy:

Creating Market linkages
Connecting farmers to identified markets for targeted products via processors, traders, exporters, and farmers’ organizations.

Activity Background

A capable and well-regulated legal industry is essential to strengthening the Rule of Law in Kosovo.  With the completion of the appointment process for judges and prosecutors, the passage of key laws governing the judiciary, and the restructuring of the courts, Kosovo must now raise the bar for the legal profession by enforcing standards for ethics and discipline, and preparing the legal workforce for the needs of the future.  

USAID’s Basic Education Program works with schools and communities to develop 21st century skills for children in primary school grades one through nine.

The United States and Chile partner on trilateral cooperation activities to work with countries to increase citizen security and promote agriculture and food safety.  The joint efforts maximize resources and expertise to help impact development strategies in a third country.

Through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Chilean International Cooperation Agency (AGCI), the countries have worked together in Central and South America and will now assist the Dominican Republic with at-risk youth.

Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) are frontline public health workers who are trusted members of and/or have an unusually close understanding of the community they serve. This trusting relationship enables CHVs to serve as a liaison/link/intermediary between health/social services and the community to facilitate access to services and improve the quality and cultural competence of service delivery.

According to World Health Organization calculations, some 1.5 million children die each year across the world from diarrheal disease and 94 percent of the cases are due to unclean water, poor sanitation, and inadequate hygiene. But the detrimental effects of these problems are by no means limited to children: they have severe and long-lasting effects on individual health and development, which taken as a whole put great stress on many developing nations. For example, illness from poor sanitation has been estimated to cost Cambodia and Vietnam over $1 billion in lost Gross Domestic Product every year due to missed workdays.

The Mekong River plays a central role in the lives of millions of people in South East Asia who depend on it for their food, water, income, and transportation. Yet it is precisely because of its importance that the river faces many challenges as the countries of the Lower Mekong – Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam -- look to the future.

The Mekong River Basin is home to 60 million people, of whom 70 percent are engaged in subsistence agriculture. These culturally diverse people are among the poorest in Asia, and they depend heavily on the river and its tributaries for food, income, transportation, and drinking water. As such, they are highly vulnerable to changes in climate. One of the expected consequences of this change is rising temperatures. As temperatures rise, many species of crops, fish and animals lose their vigor and are less able to compete, while other animal, plant and insect species move in to take their place. This can be very disruptive to agriculture and fisheries and the people that depend on them. Another change that scientific models predict is a substantial increase in weather variability. This too can have a dramatic effect on the kinds of crops that can be grown or harvested from nearby land.

Forests cover nearly 50 percent of the Lower Mekong region, providing a wide array of benefits to millions of people. Trees are one of nature’s most efficient ways of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing carbon. The region’s forests, with their unique flora and fauna, are also important sources of income and employment and contribute significantly to people’s health and the economic growth of the surrounding countryside. Yet despite the benefits, forests in the Mekong region continue to be destroyed at an alarming rate (nearly 1% per year, or more than 500,000 hectares per year), as land is converted for crops, grazing or other uses. Unsustainable and illegal logging, urbanization, and climate change also add significantly to their rapid decline. The loss and degradation of forests are important factors in global climate change, representing about 15 percent of total global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions annually. Roughly half of this amount comes from deforestation and forest degradation in Asia.

Widespread migration from the countryside is placing tremendous stress on urban water supplies and sanitation services delivery throughout Asia. This has placed a heavy burden on the nations of the Lower Mekong region as well as on the millions of urban poor who lack direct access to clean water. Further, many water services providers in Asian cities lack the proper management skills and suffer from weak governance, inefficient operations, aging infrastructure, and limited investment. Each of these contributes to poor service delivery and reduces access to safe water supply and basic sanitation. This in turn leads to higher rates of disease and child mortality from preventable waterborne illnesses and a corresponding loss of economic productivity.

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Last updated: September 14, 2014