Fact Sheets

Overview

Incentives Driving Economic Alternatives – North, East, West (IDEA-NEW) is a USAID project that began in March 2009, and is scheduled to be completed in March 2014.  This project continues USAID’s efforts to provide agricultural incentives and economic alternatives for provinces in the East as well as the northern and western poppy-prone regions of the country.

OVERVIEW
This three-year program improves the livelihoods of the rural poor in northeastern and central Afghanistan by building Afghanistan’s capacity to sustainably manage its natural resources. This is done while also strengthening linkages between local communities and regional and national government bodies, thereby improving governance.  The program focuses on two geographic areas, Band-e-Amir National Park and the Hazarajat Plateau of Bamyan province, and the Wakhan Corridor of Badakhshan province.  
 

The Northern Rangelands Trust is an umbrella organization formed in 2004 by the Lewa Conservancy and USAID. It brings together local pastoralist communities with land owners and the Government of Kenya to promote the long-term conservation of wildlife in Kenya’s northern rangelands.

The Kenya Feed the Future Innovation Engine identifies and supports innovative, problem-solving strategies to improve food security, nutrition, and livelihoods. Selected innovations are “incubated” in their early stages before being put through a process of rigorous assessment and refinement with the goal of bringing them to scale for widespread impact.

The Asset-Based Financing for Smallholder Farmers Project will help 110,000 smallholder farmers in 13 counties (listed below) of Kenya double their farm income per planted acre. More than 70% of Kenyans depend on agriculture for their livelihood. The majority of these farmers are women smallholders, yet for a variety of reasons, they are not as productive as they could be.

Tremendous progress has been made in malaria control in recent years. Widespread distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets, coupled with household spraying have helped large parts of the country become free from malaria. Nevertheless, malaria remains a leading cause of illness and death among children under 5. The burden of malaria also exacts a steep economic toll, with about 170 million working days lost due to malaria illness each year.

In Kenya, it is estimated that there are 1.6 million people living with HIV/AIDS and 1.1 million children who are orphans due to AIDS. As a whole, more than six percent of the population is infected with HIV, but the epidemic has hit specific regions and vulnerable groups much more seriously.

A strong, well-functioning and sustainable health system – capable of efficiently delivering and managing health care services – is vital to improving the health status of Kenyans. Health systems in Kenya are constrained by insufficient financial resources, a shortage and poor distribution of healthcare workers, weaknesses in legislation and information systems and a lack of management and other technical expertise. Accessing quality health services is especially difficult for women and youth.

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Last updated: September 02, 2014