Fact Sheets

USAID-funded Integrated Pest Management Innovation Lab (IPM IL) project was designed in response to the increased use of pesticides that accompanies increased horticultural production. While pesticides help to control plant pests and diseases, their use, particularly in excess, can be harmful to people as well as ecosystems in general. Integrated Pest Management is the use of multiple practices to reduce and eliminate pesticide use.

KISAN is a five-year Feed the Future (FTF) Initiative in Nepal that represents USAID’s global efforts to advance food security and nutrition objectives. Nepal was one of 19 focus countries chosen for the Presidential FTF initiative in 2010. 

 In Nepal, USAID is reducing the adverse impacts of climate change and threats to biodiversity. Building on a successful community forestry program that engages 35 percent of Nepal’s total population, USAID strengthens the ability of local communities to take ownership of their resources and manage them according to international standards. USAID also helps local governments to develop plans to overcome or adapt to climate change risks.

The Hill Maize Research Program is improving food security and increasing the incomes of 50,000 farm households—particularly poor and disadvantaged rural families—in 20 remote hill districts of Nepal where maize is a primary stable crop.

The goal of the U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security (NAP) is to empower women as equal partners in preventing conflict and building peace.

The $29.9 million, five-year Hariyo Ban project works under the U.S. Government’s Global Climate Change Initiative in Nepal. It is designed to reduce threats to the country’s vast physical and biological diversity through interventions in two critical bio-diverse areas covering over a third of the country: the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape.

Su-SWASTHA operates in the Mid-Western Region where socio-economic development lags far behind.  In 2009, there was an extensive cholera epidemic in the Mid- and Far Western Regions which claimed the lives of more than 300 people and drew attention to the urgent need for improvements of WASH conditions.  Despite the fact that young children are more susceptible to diarrheal disease caused by unclean water as well as poor sanitation and hygiene practices, school sanitation continues to be an underfunded sector in Nepal. This project aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene in 54 selected schools via a school-led total sanitation approach that not only improves sanitation in these facilities but also promotes small-scale household water treatment systems in the homes where the students and teachers live.

USAID/Nepal’s Suaahara project works closely with the government to strengthen policies and programs that will improve the health and nutritional status of women and children.

To improve the quality, accessibility and sustainability of rehabilitation services in Nepal, USAID introduced the STRIDE project in 2010. The project provides direct technical and financial support to five physical rehabilitation centers (local partner organizations) and their three satellite units in order to strengthen their institutional capability and client services.

USAID/Nepal’s Safe-WASH project contributes to the well-being of rural communities through equitable access to and efficient use of water resources and safe hygiene practices.

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Last updated: December 18, 2014