Fact Sheets

As a country that is highly vulnerable to climate change impacts, the Philippines prioritizes climate change adaptation, developing climate resilience, and disaster risk reduction and management. While the country’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions may increase, it is still relatively a low-emitter and does not have any required commitment to lower its emissions. 

Almost 90% of gastro-intetestinal related dealths globally are due to unsafe drinking water and poor sanitation. Children under the age of 5 are particularly vulnerable. Most rural communities in the Philippines still lack access to clean drinking water and improved sanitation.

Climate change poses an increasing threat to sustainable economic and energy development. The growing concerns on the massive environmental destruction arising from climate change generated significant political momentum for action on greenhouse gas emissions. 

The Philippines’ marine biodiversity has long been a key source of food security and economic activity, underpinning Philippine economic and social development for the 60% of Filipinos that live within the coastal zone, 40% of whom live in poverty (World Bank 2005).

The Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability (Be Secure) Project in the Philippines is a four-year activity that seeks to improve water security to support resilient and stable economic growth in the Philippines. It is being implemented in close coordination with the Government of the Philippines to promote good governance and build capacity in water security, improve access to water services, and build more resilient communities.

The project, also known as the Bicol Agri-Water Project (BAWP) seeks to improve water security thus, enhancing agricultural development under climate variability and change. With Php 61.5 million funding ($1.5 million) support from USAID, the project is implemented by the University of the Philippines Los Banos Foundation, Inc. for five (5) years, starting in September 2012.

Globally known for its rich biodiversity, the Philippines has more than 20,000 endemic species of plants and animals. Many of these are found in the country's forests that are being depleted at an alarming rate, threatening the Philippine economy and human well-being.

The Agusan Marsh covers an area of 110,069 hectares comprising of lakes, freshwater swamp forest, secondary scrub, herbaceous swamp, pools and rivers, rice paddies and other agricultural land and small settlements. 80% of the 117,683 people (2000) living in the marsh are Indigenous People and mostly belong to the Manobo tribe. 

Isabela Province in the Cagayan Valley is the country’s top corn producer. Climate Change poses long-term threats to the livelihoods of farmers and to national food security. According to PAGASA, the 2050 scenario in Isabela will result in a 1.9 to 2.1 C increase in temperature; a 29% decrease in mean rainfall for dry months and a 1.7% to 25.1% increase in rainfall for wet months. 

The Private Sector Mobilization for Family Health Project – Phase 2 (PRISM2) is part of the United States Agency for International Development’s continuing initiative to build enduring public-private partnerships that would assure Filipinos the availability of and access to quality modern family planning (FP) and maternal and child health (MCH) products and services.

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Last updated: September 02, 2014