Flag of Malawi

Newsroom

September 12, 2013

Overview

USAID partners with the Government of Malawi (GOM) to increase the country’s capacity to undertake and sustain uninterrupted supply of life-saving health commodities at the facility and community levels. This includes direct procurement of commodities for voluntary medical male circumcision, malaria, and reproductive health; and secured storage and monthly distribution of anti-malaria and family planning commodities to 600 public health facilities in Malawi. USAID also builds the institutional capacity of the Ministry of Health (MOH) for procurement and supply chain management through seconded advisors at the MOH and training of district health facility staff.

Impact

USAID led a multi-donor team to develop the first joint strategy for supply chain integration in Malawi. This strategy serves as a roadmap for integrating the multiple vertical supply chain systems in Malawi into the national system.  It is a catalyst for achieving operational efficiencies and cost savings. USAID works alongside the MOH to advocate for full implementation of this strategy.

September 12, 2013

The Integrating Nutrition in Value Chains (INVC) project is designed to implement USAID’s Feed the Future (FTF) and Global Health Initiative (GHI) strategies with the aim to sustainably reduce rural poverty and improve nutritional outcomes. INVC, which is USAID/Malawi’s flagship FTF project, runs from April 2012-April 2015. 

September 12, 2013

Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five in Malawi. There are approximately five million episodes of malaria per year. It is endemic in 95% of the country, with 98% of infections due to Plasmodium falciparum, the most severe form of the four human malarial species. The Ministry of Health (MOH) estimates that malaria accounts for 34% of all outpatient visits and 40% of all hospital admissions among children under five. Four out of ten hospital deaths are reported to be due to malaria. 

September 12, 2013

Securing more sustainable financing, and increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of current spending through improved health sector governance, is critical for Malawi in the coming years.

Malawi faces a range of challenges to sustainably finance and efficiently manage the delivery of high-quality health services. There is a severe shortage of adequately trained health personnel across all professional cadres, and it is difficult to train, retain, supervise, and manage existing workers within the health system. There are also critical gaps in supply chain management, infrastructure and equipment.  Donors provide over 60% of all health financing in Malawi and as much as 85% of funding for public sector health care services that serve the majority of Malawians. 

September 12, 2013

The Government of Malawi (GoM) has made agricultural development and nutrition top priorities. Under President Banda’s Presidential Initiative on Hunger and Poverty Reduction as well as the Agriculture Sector Wide Approach, the GoM is unlocking latent private sector investment and opening export markets for smallholders. USAID is collaborating with the GoM to seize these opportunities while addressing challenges in agriculture-led economic growth.

September 12, 2013

USAID works with the Ministry of Health (MOH) to strengthen its Family Planning and Sexual and Reproductive Health Program (FP/SRH). Building on a historic partnership, USAID and the MOH are implementing the National Sexual Reproductive Health Strategy to increase contraceptive coverage rates from 42% to 60% by 2020. USAID also collaborates with development partners and civil society to address rapid population growth, which remains a significant development challenge in Malawi.

Pages

Last updated: July 21, 2014

Share This Page