Flag of Malawi

Newsroom

September 12, 2013

Overview

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in Malawi.  In 2013, 20,335 new and relapse cases and 1,400 deaths were reported in Malawi.  The World Health Organization estimates that only 78% of TB cases are diagnosed in Malawi. Six in ten people with TB are also infected with HIV.  The number of TB cases in Malawi increased steadily from 1995 until 2003, when it reached its peak (28,000 cases).  Since 2003, there has been a downward trend to just over 20,000 cases recorded in 2013. This promising news is largely due to the efforts of the National TB Control Program (NTP) and its partners.

USAID shares the NTP vision of a tuberculosis-free Malawi and its activities work to reduce the morbidity, mortality, and transmission of tuberculosis until the disease is no longer a public health problem. 

September 12, 2013

USAID partners with the Government of Malawi (GOM) to increase the country’s capacity to undertake and sustain uninterrupted supply of life-saving health commodities at the facility and community levels

September 12, 2013

Clean water is vital for a healthy population.  In Malawi, 80% of the population has access to an improved source of drinking water, but that leaves about 4 million people who still lack access to safe water. Additionally, only six percent of the population has access to an improved sanitation facility. Poor sanitation practices and improper storage of drinking water commonly lead to waterborne illnesses such as cholera.

September 12, 2013

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in Malawi.  In 2013, 20,335 new and relapse cases and 1,400 deaths were reported in Malawi.  The World Health Organization estimates that only 78% of TB cases are diagnosed in Malawi.

September 12, 2013

The Integrating Nutrition in Value Chains (INVC) project is designed to implement USAID’s Feed the Future (FTF) and Global Health Initiative (GHI) strategies with the aim to sustainably reduce rural poverty and improve nutritional outcomes. INVC, which is USAID/Malawi’s flagship FTF project, runs from April 2012-April 2015. 

September 12, 2013

Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five in Malawi. There are approximately five million episodes of malaria per year. It is endemic in 95% of the country, with 98% of infections due to Plasmodium falciparum, the most severe form of the four human malarial species. The Ministry of Health (MOH) estimates that malaria accounts for 34% of all outpatient visits and 40% of all hospital admissions among children under five. Four out of ten hospital deaths are reported to be due to malaria. 

Pages

Last updated: September 12, 2014

Share This Page