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Transforming Lives

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Thanks to USAID Jasa.kg project Ramil attended sporting events, hiking trips, and other fun events with other young people.

Not long ago, Ramil*, now 19, was one of nearly 11,000 children who grow up in orphanages and boarding schools in the Kyrgyz Republic. Many are required to leave at the age of 15 to 17 because of official regulations. Having to adjust to a new life with limited support, some end up on the streets—a life Ramil knew all too well.

Dastan Umetbai Uulu

Many teenagers around the world are in high school, preparing to leave for college. But Dastan Umetbai Uulu, a 17-year-old journalist from Kyrgyzstan, is completing his 16th story in the past few years. He is a product of his own determination and the skills provided by a USAID project.

Scene from the documentary Mousetrap educating school children on ways to stop school racketeering

Curtailing Kyrgyzstan’s school racketeering culture is not a simple task—myriad forces work against progress. Some insist that the education system reflects problems within Kyrgyz society at large, including ethnic conflicts, civil unrest and powerful organized crime syndicates. 

Adina, with other volunteers, repairs and reconstructs summer camp cottages at a  residential institution for young orphans.

Like other youth in her village, at 16, Adina Bazarbaeva assumed she would eventually go to Russia to find work when she finished school. “I didn’t think I had anything to contribute to society,” she recalls. “I wasn’t focused on developing myself, setting goals, and achieving success. My life was boring.”

In recognition of its success at sustaining a business over time, StartUp Club #19 lead by Bekjan was recognized as one of the t

Nurturing entrepreneurship is considered vital to the Kyrgyz Republic's economic growth, particularly among young people who possess the creativity and drive required, yet lack the essential knowledge to develop and pursue business ideas.

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Last updated: August 26, 2014

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