Kenya Election and Political Process Strengthening Program

Funding Level:
US $23.26 million

Duration:
April 2011 – April 2015

Activity Goal:

  • Train and give technical assistance to Kenya’s Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission, political parties, civil society and the media to support Kenyans conduct free, fair and peaceful elections

Activity Accomplishments:

  • Equipped more than 20,000 civil society leaders to convene their communities and empower 46,256 Kenyans to engage in bringing the constitutional reforms to life, starting with supporting peaceful general elections in March 2013
  • Registered 14.3 million voters in 30 days using a new biometric voter registration system
  • Trained 476 election officials on the use of a secure mobile-based results transmission system that enhances transparency

Key Partners:
Independent Boundaries and Electoral Commission, Registrar of Political Parties, Political Parties Disputes Tribunal, Kenya 

Law Reform Commission

A consortium of American non-governmental organizations, led by the International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES) in partnership with the National Democratic Institute (NDI) and the International Republican Institute (IRI)

Activity Location:
Nationwide


ACTIVITY OVERVIEW
The Kenya Election and Political Process Strengthening Program provides training and technical assistance to Kenya’s Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission, political parties, civil society and the media to help Kenyans conduct free, fair and peaceful elections.  The program supports technology solutions that improve transparency and increase citizens’ confidence in the electoral process. 

ACTIVITY AREAS
The Kenya Election and Political Process Strengthening Program works hand in hand with the International Boundaries and Electoral Commission to implement the progressive electoral reforms envisioned in the 2010 Kenya Constitution. This includes election-related regulations, voter education, dispute resolution and the use of technology systems. The Program supported the Office of the Registrar of Political Parties to develop nomination and ballot production software to replace the previous manual system.

The Kenya Election and Political Process Strengthening Program worked with political parties to recruit and promote women, youth, and other marginalized groups into the party decision-making processes and develop issue-based platforms.  The Program encouraged participation in a Leadership and Campaign Academy that helped women and youth take more active roles in the parties, many standing for their party’s nomination as candidates.  People with disabilities attended the Academy with support from the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. 

The Program also promotes electoral accountability through domestic observation and empowers citizens through civic education. The Program provides training and tools to civil society leaders who in turn encourage public participation and active engagement of citizens at membership meetings and community forums.

ACTIVITY IMPACT
Jef Karang’ae registered to vote in the Kasarani constituency, at the Maji Mazuri registration center in Nairobi County. He blogs about his experience:
“I registered with the Biometric Voter Registration equipment (BVR kit) conducted by the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC). The Voter Registration drive that was launched on the 19th of November 2102 is set to run for 30 days (including weekends and public holidays) before the 18th of December, 2012 deadline, when the whole registration process comes to an end. These are the steps that I followed during the registration process, with the help of the IEBC clerks that operated the registration booths.

  1.  I present my national identification card to the IEBC clerks that man the biometric voter registration booths. They fed the data that is on my national identification card on to a manual register before proceeding to feed the same data onto a computer that is connected to the Biometric equipment.
  2. A passport photo of me is taken with web cam attached onto the computer that is attached on to the Biometric equipment.
  3. I place the four fingers on my right hand onto the Biometric Voter Registration equipment (BVR kit) which is a small black box with a green screen, before proceeding to do the same with the four fingers on my left hand.
  4. I place the two thumbs of my both hands simultaneously onto the biometric equipment.
  5. The clerks then instruct me to look at the photo that is displayed on the computer monitor in order to confirm if it is a true representation of my image.
  6. After that, I am instructed to sign a voter registration form to confirm that I actually participated in the voter registration process.
  7. I am lastly issued with a voter registration slip that confirms that I have gone through the voter registration process.

And that’s it! It’s a quick and easy process that took me a few minutes. I can now exercise my right to vote.”


USAID Contacts:
John Smith-Sreen, Director,
Office of Democracy, Rights and Governance USAID/Kenya
Tel: +254 (0)20 862 2000
E-mail: jsmith-sreen@usaid.gov

Zephaniah Aura
Activity Manager
USAID/Kenya
Tel: +254 (0)20 862 2000
E-mail: zaura@usaid.gov

Kenya Election and Political Process Strengthening Program Contact:
Michael Yard, Chief of Party, International Foundation for Electoral Systems
Tel: +254 (0) 716 867 605
Email: myard@ifes.org

Mary O’Hagan, Chief of Party, National Democratic Institute
Tel: +254 20 387 7051
Email: ohaganm@ndi.org

John Tomaszewski, Chief of Party, International Republican Institute
Tel: +254 727 588 050
Email: jtomaszewski@iri.org

Updated February 2014

Last updated: March 14, 2014

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