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February 12, 2015

Context

For more than five years, Feed the Future West/WINNER (FTF West/WINNER) has worked to identify opportunities to improve irrigation water access sustainably, while reducing the risk of floods and increasing agricultural productivity. At the Rivière Grise in the Cul-de-Sac corridor, FtF West/WINNER has constructed a water diversion structure to provide permanent water to up to 8,500 hectares of agricultural land, while limiting water levels to prevent flooding. The project has also rehabilitated several irrigation canals within the system and installed gates to control water distribution. Water distribution will be managed by the water user association AIRG, which collects user fees toward the regular maintenance of the irrigation system. Thanks to these investments, irrigation water will be provided to 10,000 farmers who will be able to grow at least two crops per year with a net income of $2,500 per hectare. This represents annual earnings of approximately $20 million for farmers of the Rivière Grise irrigation system.
 

Objectives of FtF West/WINNER

January 28, 2015

Five years after the devastating 2010 earthquake, Haiti has transitioned to a period of long-term development. With the help of the international community, Haiti has made significant advances. The U.S. post-earthquake strategy for Haiti focuses on four sector pillars designed to catalyze economic growth and build long-term stability.

February 6, 2014

Agricultural productivity in Haiti has systematically declined in the last three decades.  A shift to annual cropping on steep slopes has caused erosion and exacerbated flooding that affects the slopes, as well as the productive plain areas.  The magnitude of flooding has increased, water supplies have become much more erratic, and both lives and livelihoods are under threat.  At the same time, ground water levels in the plains have dropped substantially due to growing urban demand, and water has become increasingly brackish as seawater replaces fresh water.

February 4, 2014

Haiti currently lacks elected mayors and municipal and town councils.  In addition, one-third of the country’s 30 Senate seats are now vacant, after the terms of the previous office holders expired in May 2012.  While the Government of Haiti (GOH) has publicly committed to holding partial Senate and local elections by the end of 2013; this will be a vastly complex process, with nearly 1,420 open seats expected to be contested by over 30,000 candidates.  It will also be the first election organized since the promulgation of constitutional amendments in 2012, mandating a 30 percent quota of women in political parties and public life. 

February 4, 2014

USAID’s Parliamentary Strengthening Program (PSP) aims to improve Parliament’s ability to conduct the business of the Haitian people in a transparent, accountable, and professional manner, with the objective of increasing popular support for democratic political processes and supporting greater stability in the country. 

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Last updated: February 12, 2015

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