Map of Ethiopia

Transforming Lives

Dr. Brook Lemma, Chief Academic Officer for Research, Addis Ababa University

Malaria is a major public health problem in Ethiopia, with 75 percent of the over 80 million inhabitants at risk for malaria epidemics.

District officials during a micro-planning meeting in Adama, Ethiopia.

Accurately quantifying antimalarial commodity requirements in Ethiopia is a challenge for multiple reasons. Transmission of malaria is highly variable and characterized by frequent and often large-scale epidemics. In addition, both artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have a short shelf life.

A malaria microscopist examines blood smears in a health center in Oromia Region.

PMI/Ethiopia, in close collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Health, the Ethiopian Health Nutrition Research Institute, and the Oromia Regional Health Bureau, has been implementing malaria laboratory diagnosis and monitoring activities for the last three years. This has included developing guidelines and training materials for malaria laboratory diagnosis, training clinical and laboratory health professionals in malaria laboratory diagnosis, and supporting quality assurance/quality control systems.

ONE Moms together in Ethiopia. ONE Moms in Ethiopia.

In October 2012, a dozen ONE Moms visited Ethiopia. During their visit, the moms visited many sites including farms, schools and health clinics sponsored by a number of governmental, international and non profit organizations that are having a transformational impact on the lives of  women, their families and their communities.  

(back), U.S. Ambassador Booth, USAID Mission Director Staal, and U.S. Science Envoy Ejeta join representatives and faculty.

Most Americans have plenty of water to drink, bathe and flush the toilet, wash clothes and cars, water the lawn and fill the community pool. Even when tap water is safe to drink we often buy bottled water. Competition for oil, alternatives to fossil fuel, and the price of gasoline may be foremost on our mind. But competition for water may in fact be a greater challenge in the 21st century. As developing nations turn to hydro and solar power to fuel their energy and electric power needs, water will be the “new oil” for many nations around the world.

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Last updated: November 13, 2014

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