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Speeches and Testimony

Speeches

Speech

Friday, December 12, 2014

Your Excellency Khim Bun Song, Governor of Siem Reap

Your Excellency Em Phalla Mony, Deputy Governor

Ladies and gentlemen

Good Afternoon on behalf of U.S. people

I am honored to be here this afternoon in recognition of Cambodia’s National Day against Trafficking.  I would like to recognize the Provincial Committee to Combat Human Trafficking who have worked closely with our partner – Winrock International – to make this event a reality.  Too many Cambodians continue to be pushed into situations where they are easily exploited or trafficked.   We need to recommit our collective energy to ensure those situations are a thing of the past.

There is still more work to be done in every country, including the United States, to put an end to human trafficking.  That is why we will continue to support efforts by the Royal Government of Cambodia and civil society to increase efforts to combat all forms of human trafficking.  We will also assist survivors to continue beyond their suffering and move forward with their lives.

Speech

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

According to the WHO status report on road safety, road traffic accidents result in more than 1 million deaths globally each year. For every 1 person who dies in a road traffic crash, 20 are injured. And 1 in 20 of those injured is left with a disability.  At such a scale, this is an issue that impacts each of us. We envision a world where we and our loved ones face fewer risks as we go about our everyday lives.

But the numbers don’t really describe the huge impact that accidents have.  A traffic death may cost a family its wage earner.  Traffic injuries may mean a child won’t be able to attend school.  In short – the accidents have the potential to cost Cambodia’s government and its society heavily. What makes events like today all the more exciting, however, is that we come together not just to discuss the problem, but to celebrate a solution: the Asia Injury Prevention Foundation’s “Head Safe, Helmet On” campaign.

Speech

Friday, December 5, 2014

Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen:

Good morning.  It is my great pleasure to join you here this morning at the Private Sector Forum on the Draft Environmental Impact Assessment Law.

Today’s forum is important, because it addresses a challenge that Cambodia, as well as many countries around the world, are facing:  How do we pursue economic development without sacrificing the health of our environment? 

Speech

Thursday, December 4, 2014

The U.S. Agency for International Development, which I represent, is an important supporter of education around the world. Education is a pathway to better opportunities for every person, their community, and their nation. Through the School Dropout Prevention Program (SDPP), USAID is working closely with the Ministry of Education to achieve Cambodia’s Millennium Development Goal: Universal Access to Basic Education by 2015. The SDPP program supports the Ministry’s policy on Preventing Student from Dropout of School and Information Communication Technology in education, which calls for access to ICT for all teachers and students, especially at the secondary level.

Speech

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Globally, nearly 300,000 women and over 3 million infants die each year from complications in pregnancy and birth – with unplanned pregnancies often carrying the highest risk.  Here in Cambodia, as evidenced by our last Demographic and Health Survey, 206 Cambodian women needlessly lose their lives for every 100,000 live births -- usually from preventable and treatable causes.

Speech

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

You all are playing an important role in promoting land reform and the sustainable management and protection of Cambodia’s environment.  It is only through our combined and coordinated efforts that we can ensure a better future for millions of Cambodians. 

Speech

Friday, November 14, 2014

The U.S. government, through President Obama’s global food security initiative known as “Feed the Future,” strives to increase agricultural production, incomes, nutrition, and the resiliency of rural households.  I am very pleased to inform you all that Cambodia was one of nineteen countries in the world selected to participate in this initiative. 

Speech

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Of the many challenges we face as a global community – and there are many – health crises constitute among the most serious.  Today, the headlines tell us of the toll that Ebola has taken in West Africa.  Not long ago the world faced repeated outbreaks of SARS, multiple influenzas, not to mention the continued threat posed by HIV, malaria, tuberculosis, dengue, measles – I could go on. But I won’t.  What I do want to point out is that our single greatest defense against these threats is our health workers.  These men and women fight on the front lines every day at great risk to themselves to protect us.  Helping them to become a coordinated, disciplined, qualified, and effective fighting force is what this gathering is all about.

Speech

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

It is my great pleasure to welcome all of you today to “National Consultation Workshop on Agricultural Extension Policy.”  USAID, through its Feed the Future Initiative, is pleased to be able to provide support for the development of an Agriculture Extension Policy in cooperation with the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries.

Speech

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Cambodia has made substantial progress towards achieving its Millennium Development Goals, including reaching the targets for Goals 4 and 5 years ahead of the target dates.  I would like to congratulate the Royal Government of Cambodia, in particular the Ministry of Health, for its leadership in these efforts. The deployment of midwives to all health facilities and the endorsement of the midwifery incentive scheme are recognized as driving forces behind this great success.

Speech

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

In Cambodia today, women are living longer, healthier lives than their mothers and their mothers before them.  As the nation’s health system and economic opportunities continue to improve, Cambodian women have better access to higher-quality health services and products for themselves and their families.  Giving birth is safer than it has ever been in Cambodia, for both mothers and their newborns.  Contraceptives and other health commodities are more readily available and affordable.  Deaths due to the most lethal diseases of the past – such as tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV – are declining each year.

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Last updated: December 19, 2014

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