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Remarks by Sheri-Nouane Duncan-Jones, Director, Office of Public Health and Education, USAID Cambodia
July 17, 2014

Professor Tung Rathavy, Director of National Maternal and Child Health Centre

Distinguished colleagues, ladies and gentlemen

It is my great pleasure to join you this morning to say a few words to open this important workshop.

Let me start by thanking the officials of the National Maternal and Child Health Centre and our colleagues from the USAID-funded Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program for making this research possible and organising this important event to share the results.  I must also recognize the vital role and contributions of the public sector health providers – doctors, midwives, and all who support them – who work each day to protect the health and safety of Cambodia’s mothers and newborns in health facilities across the country.

Remarks by Sheri-Nouane Duncan-Jones, Director, Office of Public Health and Education, USAID Cambodia
July 15, 2014

In Cambodia today, women are living longer, healthier lives than their mothers and their mothers before them.  As the nation’s health system and economic opportunities continue to improve, Cambodian women have better access to higher-quality health services and products for themselves and their families.  Giving birth is safer than it has ever been in Cambodia, for both mothers and their newborns.  Contraceptives and other health commodities are more readily available and affordable.  Deaths due to the most lethal diseases of the past – such as tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV – are declining each year.

Remarks by Rebecca Black, USAID Cambodia Mission Director, at the Celebration of the One Billion Neglected Tropical Diseases Tre
June 26, 2014

More than 1 billion people - one-sixth of the world's population - suffer from one or more neglected tropical diseases, also known as NTDs.  These diseases affect the world's most vulnerable populations - those who are poorest and have little or no means to protect themselves from illness.  Their impact on individuals and communities is devastating.  In addition to the over 500,000 people who die annually from the consequences of NTDs - millions suffer from chronic disability, pain, disfigurement, and social stigma that keeps them from living full, productive lives.

April 11, 2014

USAID/Cambodia’s Civil Society Annual Program Statement

Remarks by USAID Mission Director Rebecca Black  Health Project Close-Out Event: Reflections on Five Years of Achievements
December 20, 2013

At the time that USAID/Cambodia re-opened, the Royal Government of Cambodia re-established the Ministry of Health.  In over 20 years, USAID/Cambodia and the Ministry of Health have worked closely together to rebuild and revitalize the national health system.

USAID’s implementing partners has taken on much of the work collaborating with the government to build capacity in Cambodian hospitals, health centers, and communities.  Together they have trained and supported the health care workers who improve the lives of Cambodian mothers and children every day.

Sambath Sak of USAID Cambodia speaking at the 4th International Conservation Agriculture Conference in Southeast Asia.
December 9, 2013

We are here today to help address the fact that almost 1 billion people across the globe go to bed hungry every night.  To meet the needs of a world population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050, agricultural production will need to increase by at least 60 percent.   

There is a strong consensus that agriculture plays a crucial role in any effort to reduce global poverty and hunger.   Studies suggest that every one percent increase in agricultural income per capita reduces the number of people living in extreme poverty by between 0.6 and 1.8 percent.

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Last updated: July 17, 2014

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