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Transforming Lives

Recent widow, Wajma, can now offset a lost income with the help of a cow provided by USAID’s Afghan Civilian Assistance Program

When Wajma’s* husband Faridullah was killed in a suicide attack at the Jalalabad airport on Feb. 27, 2012, she became one of the hundreds of women widowed each year as a result of the ongoing war in Afghanistan. But the mother of four had little time to grieve: “I was worried about the future and how I would support my children,” she recalls.

Frequent diner Ms. Hayda Gulzar comes to Chipsi to meet friends and enjoy tasty meals served by well-trained staff.

Rising demand for tasty meals served quickly has paid off for at least one small business owner in Herat, Afghanistan.

Engineer Nadir using the digital hammer to test the quality of concrete in Herat city.

July 2014—Mohammad Anwar, a construction materials wholesaler in the western city of Herat, Afghanistan, gloomily recalls the construction of a road in 2003 that fell prey to damage in under six months.

USAID provides credit to Afghan entrepreneurs

July 2014—Wheat is the most important crop in Afghanistan, produced by 78 percent of farmers, with wheat flour serving as a staple of the Afghan diet.

Fereshta Abbasi poses with the flag of Afghanistan at the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition in D.C

May 2014—Fereshta Abbasi always dreamed of becoming a lawyer. Now, as a law graduate, adviser to the Ministry of Women’s Affairs, and the first Afghan national to serve as a judge in the world’s largest international moot court competition, she has actualized her ambitions.

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Last updated: January 12, 2015

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