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Transforming Lives

Masuma working out at her Alzahra Fitness Sports Club

Sports and fitness buff Masuma Hossaini is determined to educate fellow Afghan women and girls on the health benefits of staying fit through exercising, and to provide a safe environment where they can work out.

Hafasa (left) is transferring electronic top up credits to one of her customers from her home-based business.

Hafasa Aubi, an Afghan economics graduate, is defying the country's trend of women’s unemployment. Working as an mHawala (mobile money) agent for Etisalat, a telecommunications company, Aubi is paving the way for other women seeking employment. As an electronic payment system, mHawala allows Afghans to pay utility bills and transfer cash by cell phone.

Recent widow, Wajma, can now offset a lost income with the help of a cow provided by USAID’s Afghan Civilian Assistance Program

When Wajma’s* husband Faridullah was killed in a suicide attack at the Jalalabad airport on Feb. 27, 2012, she became one of the hundreds of women widowed each year as a result of the ongoing war in Afghanistan. But the mother of four had little time to grieve: “I was worried about the future and how I would support my children,” she recalls.

Frequent diner Ms. Hayda Gulzar comes to Chipsi to meet friends and enjoy tasty meals served by well-trained staff.

Rising demand for tasty meals served quickly has paid off for at least one small business owner in Herat, Afghanistan.

Engineer Nadir using the digital hammer to test the quality of concrete in Herat city.

July 2014—Mohammad Anwar, a construction materials wholesaler in the western city of Herat, Afghanistan, gloomily recalls the construction of a road in 2003 that fell prey to damage in under six months.

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Last updated: January 12, 2015

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